The Journal.

The Journal.

The Wall Street Journal & Gimlet
News>Daily News
300 episodes
The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.
  • Apple has been trying for years to reinvent the healthcare system. In 2016, the company started operating its own health clinics for employees as a testing ground. But, WSJ's Rolfe Winkler explains, Apple's had a hard time accomplishing its ambitions.
    Play20m 22s
  • Americans are quitting their jobs at record rates. But why? WSJ's Lauren Weber dives into the reasons that Americans have decided to walk away from their careers during a pandemic and breaks down what it means for the economy. Plus, two quitters open up about their decision.
    Play18m 0s
  • Stocks, it turns out, don't only go up. On the final episode of To The Moon, we follow the GameStop rocket ship as it returns to Earth, and we learn how the traders who poured their money into the stock fared-and why they don't want to quit trading.
    Play35m 43s
  • Last week, Congress introduced legislation that, if passed, could force Amazon to break up. The bills come after a 15-month investigation into whether big tech has monopoly power in the economy. WSJ's Dana Mattioli speaks to Representatives David Cicilline (D., RI) and Ken Buck (R., Col.) about the...
    Play31m 39s
  • Hindenburg Research is a small investment firm that is having a big impact. Its critical reports about some of the hottest startups have pushed stock prices lower, allowing the firm to profit. WSJ's Amrith Ramkumar talks about the firm, its strategy and what happened to Lordstown Motors.
    Play16m 17s
  • A Wall Street Journal investigation has found that one hacking group - called Ryuk - is behind hundreds of attacks on U.S. health care facilities. WSJ's Kevin Poulsen details the rise of Ryuk, and one hospital administrator shares what it's like to be a victim of one of their attacks.
    Play17m 11s
  • In 2019, MoviePass declared bankruptcy. The company had offered unlimited movie tickets to customers for a low monthly fee but never found a successful business model. Last week, the Federal Trade Commission alleged that MoviePass executives deceived customers to try to save the business. WSJ's Ben...
    Play19m 18s
  • Individual investors banded together online to send GameStop soaring in January. Many of those investors were inspired by one man, Keith Gill, aka DeepF-ingValue, aka Roaring Kitty. On episode four of To The Moon, we hear how WSJ reporter Julia Verlaine tracked down Gill, and we trace how his argume...
    Play29m 24s
  • The FDA this week approved the first new Alzheimer's treatment in nearly 20 years. But it almost didn't make it to market. WSJ's Joseph Walker untangles the complex story behind the drug Aduhelm and why its approval is raising questions.
    Play22m 56s
  • Companies are using a new approach to push their executives to prioritize diversity: Tying it to their pay. WSJ's Emily Glazer explains how this tactic came about, and former executive Steven Davis talks about the role boards can play in improving diversity.
    Play15m 39s
  • Despite a surge in business during the pandemic, food delivery companies like Uber, DoorDash and Grubhub still aren't profitable. WSJ's Preetika Rana explains how these companies are pivoting away from delivering food to make money.
    Play17m 52s
  • Ransomware attacks have been hitting U.S. companies hard. But yesterday, law enforcement officials made a big announcement: they recovered more than $2 million from the group behind last month's Colonial Pipeline hack. WSJ's David Uberti details how the U.S. government is fighting back against hack...
    Play16m 28s
  • In 1980, China implemented its one-child policy to curb a swiftly growing population. After raising the cap to two in 2015, last week it was increased to three. WSJ's Jonathan Cheng on the purpose of the original policy and why the government is trying to reverse it now.
    Play17m 11s
  • Decades ago, trading was the domain of the wealthy elite, but two innovators would change that. The first made investing accessible to the masses. The second made it fun. On episode three of To The Moon, we meet the disruptors who made the markets ready for the GameStop moment. You can find episodes...
    Play28m 2s
  • Companies have been including arbitration agreements in their terms of service for years, preventing customers from filing lawsuits. Recently, Amazon removed the arbitration clause from its terms of service and told customers they can sue the company instead. WSJ's Sara Randazzo explains what led th...
    Play17m 45s
  • For years, the best-selling vehicle in the U.S. has been Ford's F-150 pickup truck. Now, Ford's making an electric version. WSJ's Mike Colias and Dan Neil explain why Ford's making the move and why it's a big test for the future of electric vehicles.
    Play16m 48s
  • Early last year, a few vaccine experts created a group that would help make sure all countries had access to covid vaccines. Called Covax, this initiative hit problem after problem. WSJ's Gabriele Steinhauser explains how this ambitious plan came undone.
    Play18m 10s
  • Amazon announced last week it is buying the Hollywood movie studio MGM for $8.4 billion, including debt. WSJ's Erich Schwartzel explains how Amazon hopes the studio will help it compete in the intensifying streaming wars.
    Play17m 15s
  • A man in a wolf mask. A wild gamble. A fortune passed on from a deceased uncle. Years before the world learned about WallStreetBets, WallStreetBets learned about the YOLO. On episode two of To The Moon, we meet the guy who started it all.
    Play29m 50s
  • When GameStop's stock surged this winter, Wall Street was shocked to learn that a bunch of amateur investors had all piled in. Who were these people and where had they come from? On episode one of To The Moon, we meet the force that shook Wall Street and hear what it's like to suddenly see $800,000...
    Play28m 42s
  • The origins of Covid-19 are still unknown, but the possibility that it could have escaped from a Chinese lab is back in the news. WSJ's Betsy McKay explains why this idea is getting renewed attention.
    Play17m 57s
  • Early this year, a storm of intrigue brewed online around the electric vehicle company Lucid Motors and its potential merger with a SPAC. WSJ's Eliot Brown explains how the buzz helped drive the valuation sky high and ultimately left some investors burned.
    Play18m 33s
  • A year after the murder of George Floyd, the Justice Department is stepping up its oversight of local police departments. Last month, the DOJ opened investigations into police conduct in Minneapolis and Louisville. WSJ's Sadie Gurman talks to Associate Attorney General Vanita Gupta about why the fed...
    Play19m 43s
  • An activist investor is trying to take over four seats on Exxon's board of directors, arguing the company should cut its emissions by 2050. But Exxon is pushing back. WSJ's Christopher M. Matthews previews the shareholder meeting showdown, where the fight will be decided.
    Play18m 29s
  • Inflation is the highest it's been in over a decade. WSJ's Jon Hilsenrath explains why the Federal Reserve says everything is under control while some other economists fret.
    Play19m 34s
  • In January, a group of Redditors started pouring their savings into the stock of GameStop, a struggling video game retailer. Overnight, everything Wall Street thought it understood about how small-time traders invest changed. While the moment may have surprised Wall Street, it was years in the makin...
    Play1m 52s
  • Sailor Mohammad Aisha was stuck on a cargo ship near the mouth of the Suez Canal for four years - alone for much of that time. WSJ's Joe Parkinson tells the story of how this could happen and how he survived.
    Play25m 30s
  • A strange thing happened last year after the rental car company Hertz filed for bankruptcy: its stock took off. Old hands on Wall Street thought that the people buying the stock - individual investors with no ties to institutions - were making a bad bet. But now, WSJ's Alexander Gladstone says, the...
    Play18m 54s
  • Car sales have been skyrocketing, but dealers have a big worry: they're running low on cars to sell. The problem isn't expected to be resolved anytime soon. WSJ's Mike Colias explains how a tiny computer chip at the end of the auto industry's long and complex supply chain is causing big problems.
    Play16m 34s
  • When AT&T bought Time Warner and DirecTV, it set out to build a media empire that could take on companies like Netflix and Disney. But after three years and a $100 billion price tag, AT&T is giving up on that dream. WSJ's Marcelo Prince says without media assets, AT&T is back to being the utility it...
    Play17m 25s
  • Banks could begin issuing credit cards to people without credit scores thanks to an effort by a banking regulator to make lending more racially equitable. WSJ's AnnaMaria Andriotis tells the story of how Black Lives Matter protests sparked the effort and explains how the lending would work.
    Play16m 13s
  • Facebook has proposed making a version of Instagram for children under 13, and the idea has prompted an outcry from lawmakers and regulators on both sides of the aisle. WSJ's Brad Reagan on Facebook's plan and New Jersey's Attorney General on why he is against it.
    Play17m 21s
  • Colonial Pipeline supplies fuel to more than a dozen states. Last Friday, a ransomware attack forced its shutdown, causing a massive shortage of gasoline. WSJ's Robert McMillan says the group behind the attack, Darkside, and others like it represent a broader threat to corporate America and the coun...
    Play17m 12s
  • NFTs, or non-fungible tokens, have made a multi-billion dollar market out of digital items like pixelated cats, basketball highlight videos and even tweets. WSJ's Caitlin Ostroff explains the history of the technology and why NFTs could move beyond digital collectibles into the physical world.
    Play15m 47s
  • WeWork CEO Sandeep Mathrani took charge of the office space company just as the pandemic hit. He's now on the brink of bringing WeWork public. We speak to Mathrani about his time at WeWork, his relationship with cofounder Adam Neumann, and the future of office work.
    Play17m 54s
  • The U.S. government reversed course last week and said it would support waiving patent protections for Covid-19 vaccines, over the objections of the pharmaceutical industry. WSJ's Yuka Hayashi explains how we got to this point.
    Play15m 51s
  • Elon Musk's SpaceX has been building out its operations in Boca Chica, Texas and pressuring residents to sell their homes. WSJ's Nancy Keates explains why some residents are pushing back, and a homeowner explains the challenges of living next to a launchpad.
    Play23m 38s
  • Oil giant Chevron has been locked in a decades-long legal battle with people living in the Ecuadorian Amazon, who claim they were harmed by oil drilling. After a $9.5 billion judgment in Ecuador in 2011, the company has fought back hard. WSJ's Sara Randazzo tells the story, and the plaintiff's lawye...
    Play22m 8s
  • Housing prices around the country have been skyrocketing. WSJ's Nicole Friedman explains what makes the hot market so unusual. And a real estate agent and a prospective buyer from Boise, Idaho, share how the boom is changing their city.
    Play19m 35s
  • As Covid-19 cases were spiking in India, the government said it had removed dozens of social media posts relating to the outbreak. WSJ's Newley Purnell traces the ongoing conflict between the government and global tech giants over freedom of speech in the world's largest democracy.
    Play17m 47s
  • Black and Latina women have been disproportionally affected by job losses during the pandemic. They're also one of the most financially fragile groups in this country. We talk with three women of color about what getting laid off in the pandemic has meant for them.
    Play23m 25s
  • After longtime "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek died last November, the show has been running a public search for a replacement, with guest hosts like Aaron Rodgers and LeVar Burton. We talk with the show's executive producer, Mike Richards, about how the search is going.
    Play18m 35s
  • There's a disconnect in the lumber market. The price of lumber is the highest it's ever been, but the price of the timber - the raw material - is at record lows. WSJ's Ryan Dezember on the paradox of the lumber market and tree farmer Joe Hopkins on how he's getting through this strange moment.
    Play19m 12s
  • WSJ's Shan Li covered the pandemic's start in Wuhan, China. Now, she is in the midst of the world's worst outbreak yet, in India. Shan told us about what it's like on the ground as numbers rise dramatically and resources are in short supply.
    Play16m 34s
  • The Biden administration has made big promises to fight climate change. U.S. Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm discusses the push for clean energy and what it means for the U.S. oil and gas industry. Plus, WSJ's Russell Gold explores what's next for oil companies.
    Play17m 50s
  • Imaad Zuberi's jet-setting lifestyle afforded him high-profile connections all around the world and made him a heavyweight donor in DC. But at the same time, according to documents, Zuberi was also collecting information for the CIA. WSJ's Byron Tau tells the story of Zuberi's rise and fall.
    Play20m 37s
  • Twelve of the biggest teams in European soccer announced Sunday they were forming a "Super League." 48 hours later, the plan was dead. WSJ's Joshua Robinson explains how a backlash from fans killed an audacious plan to remake the business of soccer.
    Play21m 29s
  • Coinbase, a popular cryptocurrency exchange, went public last week. WSJ's Paul Vigna explains how its co-founder Brian Armstrong wants to make crypto as easy as email.
    Play17m 59s
  • A day after a jury convicted Derek Chauvin of murdering George Floyd, two members of the Floyd family sat down with WSJ's Erin Ailworth to share their reactions to the trial and verdict.
    Play15m 0s
  • More than 130 rural hospitals across the U.S. have closed since 2010, while even more have cut back on services. WSJ's Brian Spegele shares the story of one Wyoming community where residents are fighting a decline in services at their local hospital by doing something drastic: creating a hospital of...
    Play17m 17s
  • Dr. Özlem Türeci is the chief medical officer of BioNTech, which created the first Covid-19 vaccine to be authorized in the U.S. We speak with Dr. Türeci about the technology behind the vaccine and the promise it holds for treating other diseases.
    Play17m 48s