The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

NPR
Business
300 episodes
A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.
  • What do Kit Kat, dog food, and mask wearing have in common? You'll find the answer in the new book Anthro-Vision. We speak with its author, journalist and anthropologist, Gillian Tett.
    Play9m 45s
  • Covid-19 has brought so much loss and hardship, but there was at least one pleasant surprise for Beijing - less hazy skies and air pollution. Today on The Indicator, the concept of experience goods. How you don't know the value of something until you actually experience it. And how in Beijing there...
    Play9m 58s
  • It's time to bust some myths about millennials... real estate edition! Millennials are a big part of the real estate boom this year. How did that happen? We speak to an industry insider and an economist to find out more.
    Play9m 52s
  • Fed Chair Jerome Powell will speak tomorrow. His words will likely be boring, but the financial markets are watching carefully. Such words seem to have serious implications. Why is that?
    Play9m 39s
  • Many people will watch movies on a big screen this summer, but the pandemic fundamentally changed the industry. How can movie theaters survive and possibly thrive post-pandemic?
    Play9m 59s
  • It's time for the Indicators Of The Week! Our three indicators are: tax, oil, and jobs. We will cover their importance and how they are relevant to Bono, the Ford F-150, and Kim Kardashian.
    Play9m 14s
  • The latest Consumer Price Index reveals 5% inflation over the last year. Should we be worried? Treasury Secretary Yellen says no. Two economists argue yes. The Indicator presents... the inflation hawks!
    Play9m 50s
  • Millions of women left the workforce during the pandemic. Today, a story about a mother's tough decision to leave work and an economist's view on the labor market for women during the pandemic.
    Play9m 48s
  • The Indicator gives out the special Beigie Award eight times each year, and it's that time today! We are honoring the Federal Reserve branch that told the story of beef. Yes, premium cuts!
    Play9m 32s
  • Zoom is the most popular video conferencing software and many people's communications lifeline during COVID. How did the tiny company beat tech giants like Google, Microsoft, and Cisco?
    Play9m 44s
  • It's Jobs Friday! It's not exactly the jobs report we wanted, but there were some bright spots. On the Indicator, we discuss the rise in self employment.
    Play9m 1s
  • Art crime is a big business, and it requires special skills to investigate. Enter Christopher Marinello, one of the world's foremost experts in art recovery.
    Play9m 58s
  • Dear graduating college classes of 2021: Congratulations! On The Indicator, Stacey and Cardiff present an economic guide to the future that awaits you.
    Play9m 42s
  • Several schools have cut women's sports teams during the pandemic, and some of the teams have lawyered up in response. Ultimately, these lawsuits ask the question: how do we measure equality?
    Play9m 54s
  • President Biden unveiled a massive budget proposal on Friday. We discuss the hefty price tag and ask two economists to weigh in on his plan.
    Play9m 50s
  • The Chehalis Tribe had a plan to create jobs and revenue. The only problem? A racist law from 1834.
    Play9m 6s
  • You may have the best product in the world, but that doesn't mean people will try it. What does it take to get consumers to try something new?
    Play9m 48s
  • When people were stuck at home during Covid lockdowns, the pet sitting business slowed to a trickle. But recently traveling has picked up and now pet sitters can barely keep up with demand.
    Play8m 49s
  • Many white millennials have made amazing progress in building wealth in recent years. Meanwhile, Black millennials keep falling further and further behind.
    Play9m 28s
  • For this edition of Indicators of the Week, we hear from economists Kate Waldock and Ben Ho about what they're looking at to signal the health of the economy: the strength of retail and Dogecoin.
    Play9m 16s
  • The Ford Lightning is the first electric F-150 pickup truck, and it could be a historical tipping point for the US auto industry. The only problem? Selling it to old-school drivers.
    Play9m 50s
  • Life constantly requires us to calculate risk, and we're just not very good at it.
    Play9m 48s
  • Obsessing over hidden treasure isn't just for pirates and conquistadors. In 2010, an eccentric art dealer launched a modern day treasure hunt that lasted ten long years.
    Play9m 59s
  • The US just backed calls by South Africa and India to waive intellectual property protection for COVID-19 vaccines, but that may not be enough to ramp up vaccine production.
    Play9m 47s
  • The Brood X cicadas are finally back this summer, but what was life like 17 years ago when they first went underground?
    Play8m 22s
  • What's the best way to persuade people to get a vaccine? A new study from the University of Pennsylvania may have the answer.
    Play9m 58s
  • Skinny jeans have reigned supreme for two decades, but now their rule seems to be ending.
    Play9m 56s
  • Taxes can be a nightmare for taxpayers and also for the under-resourced IRS. But there's an idea that could make taxes easier for everybody: only pay taxes once every two years.
    Play9m 55s
  • A cyberattack forced the shutdown of a major U.S. fuel pipeline, and the hackers wrote ... a press release? We discuss the business of hacking, and why hackers would give a press statement.
    Play9m 38s
  • Unemployment is still above 6%, but companies across the US are saying they can't find people to fill their jobs. What's going on?
    Play9m 43s
  • Sometimes companies offer sales promotions that are TOO good, ending in livid customers and a disaster for the company.
    Play9m 56s
  • The IRS helps millions of people do their taxes FOR FREE every year. But, as with many things in the past year, covid has made this a little more complicated.
    Play9m 28s
  • Millions of Americans are eligible for huge savings on health insurance due to Biden's stimulus plan, but many haven't taken up the offer. Why is it so hard to give people a break on health insurance?
    Play9m 55s
  • A new union was formed earlier this year. Why has it caught our attention? Some of its members make more than $300,000 a year, and they all work at Alphabet, Google's parent company.
    Play9m 55s
  • The pandemic spurred a year full of shortages, so why haven't producers responded by raising prices in most cases?
    Play9m 46s
  • For decades, policymakers chose to put millions of people into either a frying pan (inflation) or a fire (unemployment). An idea called the Phillips Curve was influential. But is it still?
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  • Dark patterns are online tricks used by retailers and marketers that cause you to do things that you didn't mean to do. And they're becoming more and more common.
    Play9m 11s
  • We join Stacey for her first haircut of the year, and discuss the future of the service economy as the end of the Covid-19 pandemic (hopefully!) nears.
    Play9m 47s
  • There's been a Barbie boom recently, and it's due in part to new collections of products featuring diverse skin tones and body types, as well as an accompanying PR makeover.
    Play9m 56s
  • It's almost time for The Oscars! We look back at the founding of The Oscars, and how it propelled the American movie industry to the prominence it holds today.
    Play9m 53s
  • How one man's legal fight turned 26 ambiguous words from a 1996 law into the shield big tech companies hide behind to this day.
    Play9m 38s
  • There are now more realtors than homes for sale, and this is not just concerning for real estate agents facing extra competition. New research suggests too many real estate agents can make downturns worse for the entire housing market.
    Play9m 8s
  • A lot of pandemic-related supply chain snafus have been corrected, but scientists are still struggling to get some of their most basic supplies. What's going on?
    Play9m 35s
  • People are flying again. But so many airplanes are still parked in storage. Getting them in the air again isn't always so simple.
    Play8m 46s
  • It's Beigies season! We honor the Federal Reserve Bank that added two new sections to their Beige Book entry: Worker experience and Minority- and Women- owned Business Enterprises.
    Play7m 57s
  • The Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the decline of in-person banking. But after a bank branch finally closes down, what happens to the community left behind?
    Play8m 55s
  • When the minimum wage goes up, where does the extra pay for workers come from? Princeton economist Orley Ashenfelter turned to McDonald's to look for some answers.
    Play9m 27s
  • Burlington shut down its online store right as the pandemic started, but it still weathered 2020 well. In fact, its stock prices just hit an all time high! What's Burlington's secret to success?
    Play9m 57s
  • The results are in: Amazon workers in Bessemer, Alabama will not unionize, for now. We discuss the tactics companies use to keep organized labor at bay.
    Play8m 53s
  • Cardiff picked our final installment of favorites week. We learn about an experiment that led to more low-income students attending an elite college. Sometimes all it takes is the right nudge.
    Play9m 41s
  • This favorite episode comes in the form of a mystery. Corn prices were falling, but the price of Fritos in the White House press corps break room went up by 20%. The Indicator was on the case.
    Play9m 48s