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The Daily

The Daily

The New York Times
News>Daily News
1215 episodes
This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.
  • In this episode of The Sunday Read, we revisit a story from our archives. When the university told one woman about the sexual-harassment complaints against her wife, they knew they weren’t true. But they had no idea how strange the truth really was. This story was written by Sarah Viren and record...
    Play52m 4s
  • From the earliest days of the pandemic, herd immunity has consistently factored into conversations about how countries can find their way out of lockdowns and restrictions. Now, many experts believe that the United States may never reach the requisite level of immunity. We explore why, and what it...
    Play23m 27s
  • Was Facebook right to indefinitely bar former President Donald J. Trump from the platform after the Capitol riot? The company’s oversight board, which rules on some of the thorniest speech decisions on the platform, decided that, while the ban was justified at the time, the parameters of the suspen...
    Play23m 35s
  • Japan is the “grayest” nation in the world. Close to 30 percent of the population is over 65. The reason is its low birthrate, which has caused the population to contract since 2007. With the birthrate in the United States also dropping, what are the implications of a shrinking population, and what...
    Play28m 3s
  • The latest census revealed that the United States had seen the second-slowest decade of population growth since 1790, when the count began. The country may be entering an era of substantially lower population growth, demographers said. How could this redefine the nation’s future? Guest: Sabrina T...
    Play24m 18s
  • Inside the world of complaint sites and what can be done about the “the bathroom wall of the internet.”
    Play23m 35s
  • For years, Dan-el Padilla Peralta, a Dominican-born teacher of classics at Princeton, has spoken openly about the harm caused by the discipline’s practitioners in the two millenniums since antiquity — the classical justifications of slavery, race science, colonialism, Nazism and other 20th-century f...
    Play57m 56s
  • For at least a decade, allegations of cheating have swirled around elections in rural Bladen County, N.C. Some people point fingers at a Black advocacy group, the Bladen County Improvement Association, accusing it of bullying voters, tampering with ballots and stealing votes outright. These allegati...
    Play3m 57s
  • Joanna Lopez, the high school senior we met in our first episode of Odessa, has turned inward: staying in her bedroom, ghosting friends and avoiding band practice. But playing with the marching band at the last football game of her high-school career offers a moment of hope that maybe, one day, thin...
    Play44m 35s
  • In his first speech to a joint session of Congress, President Biden set out an expansive vision for the role of American government. He spent much of the address detailing his proposals for investing in the nation’s economic future — spending that would total $4 trillion. We analyze the president’s...
    Play27m 19s
  • At the beginning of this year, many people in India thought the worst of the pandemic was finished there. But in the last few weeks, any sense of ease has given way to widespread fear. The country is suffering from the worst coronavirus outbreak in the world, with people being turned away from ful...
    Play24m 10s
  • During a global climate summit, President Biden signaled America’s commitment to fighting climate change with an ambitious target: The U.S. will cut its economywide carbon emissions by 50 percent of 2005 levels by 2030. What became clear is that the rest of the world has become cautious about fol...
    Play27m 1s
  • In recent years, Russia has tried to reassert its global influence in many ways, from military action in Ukraine to meddling in U.S. elections. So when Russia developed a coronavirus vaccine, it prioritized exporting it to dozens of other countries — at the expense of its own people. Today, we loo...
    Play26m 46s
  • In summer 2003, Shahawar Matin Siraj, then 21, met Osama Eldawoody, a nuclear engineer twice his age. To Mr. Siraj’s delight they struck up an unlikely friendship — never before had someone this sophisticated taken him so seriously. At the older man’s encouragement, Mr. Siraj became entangled in a...
    Play1h 13m 18s
  • This episode contains strong language. On Sunday, 12 elite soccer teams in Europe announced the formation of a super league. The plan was backed by vast amounts of money, but it flew in the face of an idea central to soccer’s identity: You have to earn your place. Fans reacted with blind fury and...
    Play28m 42s
  • Last spring, Brandon Hole’s mother alerted the police in Indiana about her son’s worrying behavior. Invoking the state’s “red flag” law, officers seized his firearm. But Mr. Hole was able to legally purchase other weapons, and last week, he opened fire on a FedEx facility, killing eight people and t...
    Play24m 3s
  • On Tuesday, after three weeks of jury selection, another three weeks of testimony and 10 hours of deliberations, Derek Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer, was found guilty of murder in the death of George Floyd. The jurors found Mr. Chauvin guilty of all three charges: second-degree murder...
    Play30m 10s
  • Just four months into 2021 and there have already been more than 80 bills, introduced in mostly Republican-controlled legislatures, that aim to restrict transgender rights, mostly in sports and medical care. But what’s the thinking behind the laws, and why are there so many? We look into the motiv...
    Play29m 5s
  • When a nuclear fuel enrichment site in Iran blew up this month, Tehran immediately said two things: The explosion was no accident, and the blame lay with Israel. Such an independent action by Israel would be a major departure from a decade ago, when the country worked in tandem with the United State...
    Play23m 29s
  • The Skagit Valley choir last sang together on the evening of March 10, 2020. This rehearsal, it would turn out, was one of the first documented superspreader events of the pandemic. Of the 61 choristers who attended practice that night, 53 developed coronavirus symptoms. Two later died. The event s...
    Play48m 32s
  • This episode contains strong language and emotional descriptions about the challenges of parenting during the pandemic, so if your young child is with you, you might want to listen later. Several months ago, The Times opened up a phone line to ask Americans what it’s really been like to raise child...
    Play23m 52s
  • Today, science writer Carl Zimmer explains the decision-making process, how long the suspension might last and the impact it could have not only in the U.S. but around the world. Guest: Carl Zimmer, a science writer and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times.
    Play24m 28s
  • In a ruling a few days ago, the Supreme Court lifted coronavirus restrictions imposed by California on religious services held in private homes. The decision gave religious Americans another win against government rules that they say infringe on their freedom to worship. With the latest victory, the...
    Play25m 11s
  • It started with a picture posted on the internet, and ended in an extravagant cryptocurrency bidding war. NFTs, or “nonfungible tokens,” have recently taken the art world by storm. Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The Times, speaks with the Times columnist Kevin Roose about digital cu...
    Play31m 6s
  • Europe’s vaccination process was expected to be well-orchestrated and efficient. So far, it’s been neither. Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The Times, spoke with our colleague Matina Stevis-Gridneff about Europe’s problems and why things could get worse before they get better. Guest...
    Play26m 42s
  • The author Philip Roth, who died in 2018, was not sure whether he wanted to be the subject of a biography. In the end, he decided that he wanted to be known and understood. His search for a biographer was long and fraught — Mr. Roth parted ways with two, courted one and sued another — before he se...
    Play27m 57s
  • Last fall, as Odessa High School brought some students back to campus with hybrid instruction, school officials insisted mask wearing, social distancing and campus contact tracing would keep students and faculty safe. And at the beginning of the semester, things seemed to be going OK. But then a spi...
    Play39m 55s
  • In Minneapolis, the tension is palpable as the city awaits the outcome of the trial of Derek Chauvin, the police officer accused of murdering George Floyd last summer. The court proceedings have been both emotional — the video of Mr. Floyd’s death has been played over and over — and technical. At...
    Play32m 21s
  • The I.R.S. says that Bristol Myers Squibb, America’s second-largest drug company, has engaged a tax-shelter setup that has deprived the United States of $1.4 billion in tax revenue. The Biden administration is looking to put an end to such practices to pay for its policy ambitions, including infras...
    Play20m 59s
  • How one woman with a grudge was able to slander an entire family online, while the sites she used avoided blame.
    Play30m 32s
  • Two months ago, Myanmar’s military carried out a coup, deposing the country’s elected civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, and closing the curtains on a five-year experiment with democracy. Since then, the Burmese people have expressed their discontent through protest and mass civil disobedience. Th...
    Play25m 46s
  • During the pandemic, cheerleader-ish girls performing slithery hip-hop dances to rap music on TikTok has been the height of entertainment — enjoyed both genuinely and for laughs. Addison Rae, one such TikToker, is the second-most-popular human being on the platform, having amassed a following large...
    Play51m 35s
  • President Biden is pushing the boundaries of how most Americans think of infrastructure. In a speech on Wednesday, he laid out his vision for revitalizing the nation’s infrastructure in broad, sweeping terms: evoking racial equality, climate change and support for the middle class. His multitrilli...
    Play26m 4s
  • Since its earliest days, Amazon has been anti-union, successfully quashing any attempt by workers to organize. A group of workers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Ala., just might change that — depending on the outcome of a vote this week. We look at how their effort came together and what it m...
    Play38m 35s
  • Republican-led legislatures are racing to restrict voting rights, in a broad political effort that first began in the state of Georgia. To many Democrats, it’s no coincidence that Georgia — once a Republican stronghold — has just elected its first Black senator: Raphael Warnock. Today, we speak to t...
    Play28m 35s
  • Georgia, a once reliably red state, has been turning more and more purple in recent years. In response, the Republican state legislature has passed a package of laws aimed at restricting voting. Today, we look at those measures and how Democrats are bracing for similar laws to be passed elsewhere i...
    Play27m 6s
  • On the docket on Monday at a Minneapolis courthouse is the biggest police brutality case in the United States in three decades: the trial of Derek Chauvin, a white former police officer accused of killing George Floyd, a Black man, last year. The case centers on a 10-minute video, shot by a bystand...
    Play28m 30s
  • It was in the winter of 2016 that Jan Six, a Dutch art dealer based in Amsterdam, made a discovery that would upend his life. He was leafing through a Christie’s catalog when he spotted a painting featuring a young man wearing a dazed look, a lace collar and a proto-Led Zeppelin coif. Christie’s had...
    Play1h 2m 43s
  • The Good Shepherd Nursing Home in West Virginia lifted its coronavirus lockdown in February. For months, residents had been confined to their rooms, unable to mix. But with everybody now vaccinated, it was finally time to see one another again. We share some of the relief and joy about the tip-toe...
    Play34m 36s
  • The United States has never undertaken a vaccination campaign of the scale and speed of the Covid-19 program. Despite a few glitches, the country appears to be on track to offer shots to all adults who want one by May 1. We look at the ups and downs in the American vaccination campaign and describe...
    Play26m 43s
  • In less than a week, the United States has seen two deadly mass shootings: one in Boulder, Colo., and another in the Atlanta area. These events prompted President Biden to address the nation on Tuesday. In his speech, he said it was time to ban assault weapons. Mr. Biden has been here before. He ha...
    Play21m 45s
  • For Tejal Rao, a restaurant critic for The Times, a sense of smell is crucial to what she does. After she contracted the coronavirus, it disappeared. It felt almost instant. “If you’re not used to it, you don’t know what’s going on,” she said. “It’s almost like wearing a blindfold.” We follow Tejal...
    Play22m 20s
  • This episode contains strong language. Ivan Agerton of Bainbridge Island, Wash., was usually unflappable. A 50-year-old adventure photographer and former marine, he has always been known to be calm in a crisis. Soon after testing positive for the coronavirus this fall, he began experiencing psychosi...
    Play27m 41s
  • The bright elastic throats of anole lizards, the Fabergé abdomens of peacock spiders and the curling, iridescent and ludicrously long feathers of birds-of-paradise. A number of animal species possess beautifully conspicuous and physically burdensome features. Many biologists have long fit these tas...
    Play52m 38s
  • Introducing the new season of “Still Processing.” The first episode is the one that the co-hosts Jenna Wortham and Wesley Morris have been wanting to make for years. They’re talking about the N-word. It’s both unspeakable and ubiquitous. A weapon of hate and a badge of belonging. After centuries of...
    Play3m 42s
  • Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York is known as a hard-charging, ruthless political operator. But his power has always come from two sources: legislators’ fear of crossing him and his popularity among the electorate. After recent scandals over bullying allegations, his administration’s handling of nursi...
    Play36m 55s
  • The pandemic has precipitated a rise in anti-Asian violence in the U.S. However, the full extent of this violence may be obscured by the difficulty in classifying attacks against Asian-Americans as hate crimes. A recent shooting at three spas in the Atlanta area, in which the eight victims included...
    Play24m 21s
  • The passage of the stimulus package last week ushered in an expansion of the social safety net that Democrats have celebrated. But one key policy was not included: a doubling of the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour. Today, we look at the history of that demand, and the shifting political and ec...
    Play24m 36s
  • Wyoming has powered the nation with coal for generations. Many in the state consider the industry part of their identity. It is in this state, and against this cultural backdrop, that one of America’s largest wind farms will be built. Today, we look at how and why one local politician in Carbon Coun...
    Play26m 55s
  • Just a few months ago, Israel was in dire shape when it came to the coronavirus. It had among the highest daily infection and death rates in the world. Now, Israel has outpaced much of the world in vaccinating its population and hospitalizations have fallen dramatically. Today, how it is managing...
    Play24m 57s
  • Long before it became an archaic and filthy symbol of everything wrong with America’s broken cities, the New York subway was a marvel. In recent years, it has been falling apart. Today on The Sunday Read, a look at why failing to fix it would be a collective and historic act of self-destruction.
    Play1h 55s